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Alvin Cockrell DE-366 - History

Alvin Cockrell DE-366 - History


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Alvin C. Cockrell

(DE-366: dp. 1,350,1. 306'0", b. 36'8", dr. 9'5" (mean) s. 24 k. cpl. 186; a. 2 5", 4 40 mm., 10 20 mm., 2 dct., 6 dep., 1 dep. (hh. ) 3 21 tt.; cl. John C. Butler)

Alvin C. Cockrell (DE-366) was laid down on 1 May 1944 at Orange, Texas, by the Consolidated Steel Corp.; launched on 27 June 1944; sponsored by Mrs. James A. Perkins, the sister of the
late 1st Lt. Cockrell, and commissioned on 7 August 1944 at her builder's yard, Lt. Comdr. Merrill M. Sanford, USNR, in command.

After initial fitting out alongside the City Docks at Orange Alvin C. Cockrell shifted to Galveston, Texas, arriving on 11 October, and continued fitting out at the Todd-Galveston Shipbuilding, Inc., yard. Completing these preparations for service on 25 October, she sailed for Bermuda that afternoon in company with her sister ship French (DE-367), for shakedown training. Arriving at noon on the last day of October, the new destroyer escort carried out her shaedown training out of Bermuda until 29 November, after which time she sailed for Boston Navy Yard and post-shakedown availability. Underway from Boston on 10 December, Alvin C. Cockrell arrived at Norfolk the following day.

On 15 December, Alvin C. Cockrell sailed from Norfolk, and escorted the attack transport Thoma.s Jefferson (APA-30) to the Panama Canal Zone, arriving there on the 20th. Transiting the canal the same day, the destroyer escort then proceeded independently to San Diego, arriving there three days after Christmas of 1944. She sailed thence for the Hawaiian Islands, reaching Pearl Harbor on the afternoon of 7 January 1945.

Alvin C. Cockrell then spent the next several days operating locally out of Pearl Harbor, conducting target practice, serving as a target for a division of motor torpedo boats, undergoing an availability alongside the destroyer tender Yosemite (AD-19), and carrying out gunnery exercises with student officers from the Destroyers, Pacific, gunnery school manninng gun control stations. On 17 January, the destroyer escort, accompanied by French, sailed from Hawaiian waters for the Marshalls as escort for convoy PD-256-T—one transport and five attack transports. Reaehing Eniwetok on 25 January, the destroyer escort remained there only briefly, getting underway for the Palaus the following day and convoying the same half-dozen shins she had shepherded from Hawaii. Detaching the transport Wharton (AP-7) to proceed independently to Ulithi Atoll, the convoy proceeded on reaching its destination Kossol Roads, on the last day of January.

Over the next several weeks, Alvin C. Cockrell escorted convoys between Eniwetok, Guam, Saipan, Ulithi, and Kossel Roads, and, when required, served as harbor patrol and air-sea rescue vessel. She carried out her first air-sea rescue mission on 23 February 1945, when she sailed from Ulithi to go to the assistance of a Martin PBM-3D "Mariner" flying boat from Patrol Bombing Squadron 22 that had been forced down by engine trouble. Underway at 1008, Alvin C. Cockrell proceeded at flank speed, guided to the scene by a "dumbo" plane overhead.

She put her whaleboat over the side as she neared the "Mariner", to take off the crew and attempt to take the aircraft in tow, and soon had seven of the nine enlisted men (two had remained on board to handle towlines), and the three officers from the crew on board. While the destroyer escort Manlove

(DE-36) screened the operation, Alvin C. Cockrell managed to get the plane under tow by 0910 the following day, after which time the destroyer escort set out for Ulithi. Unfortunately, soon after the remaining crewmen from the plane were taken on board the towline parted. Further attempts at salvage by Manlove proved fruitless and, ultimately, the "Mariner" (one wing of which had been damaged in the initial attempt to get a line to it) had to be sunk by gunfire.

The next instance of rescue occurred on 22 March 1945, while the ship was stationed on harbor entrance patrol at Apra Harbor Guam. At 1540 on that day, Alvin C. Cockrell received orders to depart from her patrol station for an air-sea rescue mission 12 miles from Orote Point. Once again guided by aircraft overhead the destroyer escort spotted a life raft and its two occupants shortly before 1800, and by 1804 the ship had brought on board Lt.(jg.) Kenneth B. Coleman, USNR, and Aviation Radioman 3d (>lass H. Moorhead. Transferring them to a picket boat sent out for that purpose, Alvin C. Cockrell then resumed Patrolling her station.

In June, while at Kossol Passage, in the Palaus, she was directed to put to sea to search for reported airplane wreckage. In company with the destroyer escort Naifeh (DE-352), she searched the assigned area on 14 June and the days following, but found nothing. A simular search conducted off Peleliu during the waning days of July 1945 also yielded no trace of downed planes or pilots reported in her vicinity.

The final month of the war, August 1945, began with Alvin C. Cockrell operating with the Palau Island Patrol and Escort Unit keeping watch on the by-passed Palaus and the Japanese garrisons there. On 2 August, the ship departed her patrol station on orders to pick up two men from a raft reported by a patrol plane. The two turned out to be Japanese soldiers or laborers attempt- to escape from Babelthuap and hoping for an American ship to pick them up. Alvin C. Cockrell turned them over to a small boat for transfer ashore, and resumed her patrol.

On 5 August, however, while operating in the Peleliu-Angaur antisubmarine screen, Alvin C. Cockrell received orders to proceed at full speed to the scene of the sinking of the heavy cruiser Indianapolis (CA-35). She arrived in the area at 0600 and commenced a search in company with the destroyers Madison (DD-425), Helm (DD-388), and Ralph Talbot (DD-390), and the destroyer escort Dufilho (DE-423). One flying boat orbitted overhead.

With each ship proceeding to cover an assigned sector, Alvin C. Cockrell began finding grim evidence of the tragedy that had befallen the cruiser. She sighted two empty rubber rafts at 1007 and recovered an unidentified body at 1115, quickly burying it at sea. A half-hour later, at 1145, the ship spotted several other corpses—six of which were given a burial soon thereafter. Only one of the six was identifiable, and the advanced state of decomposition in all indicated that they had been dead for several days.

Many had life jackets, and a few had clothing. The destroyer escort sighted very little debris or wreckage by that point, and "no signs of any live survivors. " Eventually ordered to break off the search and return to her regular operating base, Alvin C. Cockrell departed the area at 0622 on 6 August to return to Peleliu.

The end of the war in mid-August saw Alvin C. Cockrell still assigned local operations out of Peleliu. These lasted until 19 August, when she joined other units of Escort Division (CortDiv) 86 at Ulithi. She then proceeded to Okinawa for duty with the 5th Fleet, reporting on 26 August.

Alvin C. Cockrell departed Buckner Bay on 9 September 1945, bound for Japan with Task Unit (TU) 56.5.2-one light cruiser, an escort carrier, a dock landing ship, two hospital ships a seaplane tender and a Coast Guard cutter, three destroyer escorts (including Alvin C. Cockrell) and three fast transports (converted from destroyer escorts) rounded out the screen. Steaming for Wakanoura Wan to evacuate Allied prisoners of war (POWs), the task unit reached Kii Suido and entered Wakanoura Wan in the wake of the minesweeping group on 11 September. The task unit anchored at 1820 that day. With the completion of the evacuation—part of her shiu's company serving on ashore during that time—on 15 September, the destroyer escort was assigned to Task Force 51 the same day

After riding out a typhoon that swept through the area on 17 and 18 September, Alvin C. Cockrell operated as one of four destroyer escorts serving as the mine screen for the escort carriers Makin Island (CVE-93) and Santee (CVE-29), as those ships' planes covered the occupation of Wakayama on 24 to 26 September. During this period, the destroyer escort sank two Japanese mines with gunfire.

Soon thereafter, Alvin C. Cockrell departed Wakanoura Wan in company with French and screening Siboney (CVE-112), putting to sea with a search group on 7 October to rendezvous with other ships looking for a PBM believed down at sea, among the "Mariner s" passengers was Rear Admiral William D. Sample who was along on the flight to familiarize himself with the area. The special search mission continued on 8 October, and, with short breaks for refueling, continued over the ensuing days until the search was ordered abandoned on 17 Oetober.

Proceeding to Yokosuka, Alvin C. Cockrell stood out of that port on 24 Oetober as part of the screen for Sihoney and Puget Sound (CVE-113) as the earriers' planes covered the occupation of Nagoya. The destroyer escort returned to Wakanoura Wan on 26 October, but sailed thence for Yokosuka the following day arriving on the 28th. During November and December 1945, Alvin C. Cockrell served as courier ship between Yokosuka, Kure, and Wakayama, shuttling passengers and mail between those ports. She interrupted this routine briefly on 10 and 11 November when she operated with Siboney as the escort carrier conducted gunnery drills and flight training.

Relieved from duty with the 5th Fleet on 2 January 1946 Alvin C. Cockrell sailed for the United States. She touched briefly at Pearl Harbor on 14 January, and later proceeded thence to the west coast, reaching San Francisco on 22 January. Decommissioncd and placed in reserve at San Diego on 2 July 1946, Alvin C. Cockrell remained inactive until returned to active duty with the buildup of the fleet during the Korean War.

Recommissioned on 27 June 1951, Lt. Thomas R. Pear- in command, Alvin C. Cockrell was assigned to Escort Squadron (CortRon) 3, and over the next two years served as a trauning ship for the Fleet Sonar School, San Diego. She conducted antisubmarine warfare (ASW) type-training exercises, and served as courier ship between San Diego and Long Beach.

Deploying to the western Pactfic (WestPac) for the first time since the end of World War II, Alvin C. Cockrell sailed for the Far East in August 1953. She served as station ship at Hong Kong, for three months before she proceeded to the Philippine Islands and visited Sangley Point and Subic Bay. She also visited Bangkok, Thailand, during this deployment, and operated for two weeks in the Gulf of Siam, traimng sailors from the Thai Anned Forces Academy at Sattahip, in gunnery and engineering. Returning to San Diego by way of Guam, Midway, and Pearl Harbor, the destroyer escort reached San Diego in March 1954 and operated locally into the autumn of 1955. Her regular overhaul at the Long Beach Naval Shipyard, conducted during March and April 1955, punctuated that period of local operations, and saw the ship being converted for service as a flagship.

Deploying to the Far East again in October 1955, Alvin C.

Cockrell was designated flagship of CortRon 3 in December 1955. During the course of this cruise, the ship participated in a wide variety of evolutions, ranging from hunter-killer exercises to covering Marine Corps amphibious landings and convoy escort cubes. Her ports of eall on this WestPae eruise encompassed Hong Kong, Keelung and Kaohsiung, Taiwan; Okinawa, and the Japanese ports of Atami, Sasebo and Yokosuka. Returning to San Diego at the end of March 1956, Alvin C. Cockrell spent the next nine months engaged in local operations out of that port serving as sonar school ship and participating in several minor ASW training operations. Highlighting the latter period was the ship's participation m a fleet review at San Diego on 14 September 1956.

During 1957, Alvin C. Cuckrell deployed to WestPac with CortRon 3, visiting the southern and western Pactfic. During the course of this cruise, she visited Kwajalein Atoll, in the Marshalls; Auckland, New Zealand; Manus, in the Bismarck Archipelago; Yokosuka, Japan; Okinawa, Kaohsiung; Singapore, Hong Kong; Corregidor, Subic Bay, and Manila. She participated in exercise "Beacon Hill" in the Philippines, a SEATO (South East Asia Treaty Organization) exercise, "Astra", in the Gulf of Siam and South China Sea with units of the British, Australian, New Zealand, French, and Thai Navies; and spent a month on surveillance patrols in the Carolines, Marianas, and Bonins, visiting several islands famous in World War II: Guam, Ponape, Iwo Jima, Truk, Tinian, and Saipan. Returning to San Diego in early July, via Midway and Pearl Harbor, Alvin C. Cockrell underwent her regular overhaul at the Mare Island Naval Shipyard between October 1957 and January 1958.

For the first six months of 1958, the destroyer escort deployed to the central and western Pactfic, her ports of call included Yokosuka, Hong Kong, and Subic Bay. She participated in a joint Air Force-Navy "Handclasp" project a 7th Fleet weapons demonstration for Asian political and military leaders, and spent two of the six months in the Carolines, Marianas, and Bonins, on surveillance patrol. She returned to San Diego in mid-June 1958, via Midway and Pearl Harbor as in previous deployments.

After she had brought her fourth WestPac deployment to a close, Alvin C. Cockrell was assigned Naval Reserve Training (NRT) ship duties with Reserve Escort Squadron 1 on 1 July 1958, homeported at San Francisco. Decommissioned on 17 January 1959 the ship was designated a Group II destroyer escort in the ASW surface component of the selected reserve and remained "m service" to provide underway training for her own selected reserve crew of inactive reserve officers and men. Two active duty officers and 36 enlisted men maintained the ship and on the third weekend of each month, a reserve crew of 161 officers and men would embark to steam and train their own ship. For two weeks each year the reserve crew would embark, and, integrated with the active duty men, would carry out a two week reserve training cruise. In May 1959, the ship moved to her new home port, the Naval and Marine Corps Reserve Training Center at Alameda, Calif

For the next two years the ship maintained this routine, until the Berlin crisis in the autumn of 1961 resulted in a call-up of reserve units. In September 1961, President John F. Kennedy directed that all ASW surface components of the selected reserve forces report for active duty on l October 1961. Accordingly, Alvin C. Cockrell was recommissioned on l October 1961, Comdr. Robert A. Bush in command. After the ship underwent a routine overhaul, her home port was changed to Pearl Harbor. She sailed for Hawaii on 2 January 1962, and took part in a large-scale, opposed-entry exercise at Pearl Harbor ten days later.

Increased tensions in the Far East soon resulted in Alvin C. Cockrell's sailing for that area of the globe; following refresher training, the destroyer escort departed Hawaiian waters on 24 February 1962 with CortDiv 72, which consisted of Alvin C. Cockrell (flagship), Vammen (DE-644), Marsh (DE-699) and Charles E. Brannon (DE-446). Proceeding to Subic Bay via Guam and Miday, Alvin C. Cockrell reported for duty with Task Force 72 upon arrival at Subic on 11 March 1962.

One week later, on 18 March, Alvin C. Cockrell sailed for Danang, Republic of Vietnam, for operations with units of the South Vietnamese Navy. She conducted intensive training assistance with units of that force, improving general ship-to-shore communications and providing on-the-job training for Vietnamese sailors.

Visiting Hong Kong from 5 to 11 April 1962, Alvin C. Cockrell then proceeded to Subic Bay, for tender availability alongside Delta (AR-9). Following that period of repairs and upkeep, the destroyer escort sailed for the Gulf of Siam and conducted operations there between 20 April and 2 May. She conducted a four-day port visit to Saigon, the capital of South Vietnam, and then returned to Subic Bay. Cockrell ultimately sailed for Yokosuka on 21 May, and then participated in exercises the first week of June. Proceeding via Midway, the destroyer escort reached Pearl Harbor on 18 June 1962 and commenced a twoweek availability alongside the destroyer tender Bryce Canyon (AD-36).

Sailing thence for San Francisco, Alvin C. Cockrell reached her destination on 17 July 1962, and was decommissioned on 1 August 1962, reverting to "in service" status as a Group II NRT ship. She remained in that status for the rest of her career. During 1963 her two-week active training cruise took her to Hawaiian waters. In 1964 she conducted intensive refresher training at San Diego. The cruise for August 1965 found the ship visiting the Canadian ports of Vancouver and Esquimalt. In 1966 she operated out of San Diego. In the summer of 1967, the ship visited Vancouver and Seattle, Wash., in the course of her twoweek cruise.

Decommissioned on 20 September 1968 Alvin C. Cockrell was struck from the Naval Vessel Register on 23 September 1968. Her hulk was subsequently utilized in weapons testing and she was sunk on 19 September 1969.


Alvin Cockrell DE-366 - History

An illustrated history (undated) of the USS Alvin C. Cockrell (DR 366) by George L. Clark, Jr.

Scope and arrangement

The escort ship USS ALVIN C. COCKRELL (DE-366) was named for First Lieutenant Alvin C. Cockrell, U. S. Marine Corps Reserve, who was killed in action during World War II at Guadalcanal on September 24, 1942.

This monograph, An Illustrated History of the USS ALVIN C. COCKRELL (DE-366) includes an index of terms and is heavily illustrated with photographs, and copies of declassified materials, including deck logs and orders. The book begins with a short introduction about the classification and uses of escort ships. The body of the volume begins with a biographical note about Alvin C. Cockrell and the activities of the 7th Marine Regiment at Guadalcanal.

Christened and launched (August 8, 1944), the ALVIN C. COCKRELL was intended for escort duty (pp. 39-40), though a number of air and sea rescues are described off Yap Island (p. 43) and Guam (pp. 44-45). Also included is a very detailed description (pp. 50-58) of the rescue of the crew of heavy cruiser USS INDIANAPOLIS (CA-35) after it was torpedoed and sunk by a Japanese submarine. Included are deck logs from this search (August 2-7, 1945, pp. 59-64), photographs of burials of the dead at sea (pp. 66-67), and track charts of the search operations (pp. 68-73). Correspondence describes the condition of allied prisoners of war brought to the Wakayama Evacuation Unit that includes descriptions of the residential section of the city, the railroad station, and the physical condition of the men (September 15, 1945, pp. 79.2-79.10). Also contained in the narrative is the war diary for the ALVIN C. COCKRELL that also details the vessel's post-World War II activities in Japan (December 1944-July 1946, pp. 85-120).

The narrative also details the decommissioning (July 1946) and recommissioning (June 1951) of the ship for anti-submarine activity and as a support ship based in Hong Kong during the Korean War (pp. xvi, 132). The ALVIN C. COCKRELL also details training cruises for the Selected Reserves as the flagship for Escort Squadron 3 in 1955(pp. 152-178), and surveillance in and around South Vietnam with Escort Squadron 7, including Saigon (pp. 238.2-238.4). A deck log (May 4, 1962) and a description of patrols (p. 244) are included, and Naval Reserve training is described (pp. 256-263). The account concludes with details of the ship being used for hull strength testing, its decommissioning, and sinking (pp. 272-276) a list of officers and their biographies (pp. 285-296) and a chronology of the ship's activities (pp. 297-304).

Administrative information
Custodial History

September 13, 1995 , 1 volume An Illustrated History of the USS ALVIN C. COCKRELL (DE-366) by George L. Clark, Jr. Gift of Mr. George L. Clark, San Francisco, CA.


Alvin Cockrell DE-366 - History

Yap Island Mission Loss&mdash23 February 1945

The following plane was lost on 23 February 1945 on a mission to Yap Island. I would greatly appreciate anyone's help to locate additional information regarding the information listed below.Submit additional information, updates, newpaper articles, pictures, and supporting documents to: [email protected]

  1. Strawser, L.C., Ens.
  2. Lamb, C.H., Ens.
  3. Tadman, W.F., AMM!/c
  4. McMullen, J.P., ARM1/2 (T)
  5. Fusco, L.C., ARM2/c (T)
  6. Willig, R.P., ARM3/c
  7. Walden, W.L., AMM3/c
  8. Thompson, I.E., AOM3/c
  9. Murray, T. H., S1/c
  10. Carrico, O.L. AOM2/c
  11. Cannizzaro, R.J. AMM3/c

The crew was picked up by the USS Alvin C. Cockrell (DE-366).

    During WW2 I was a Flight Engineer and Gunner in VPB 22 we were flying a PBM Martin Mariner. Sat. Feb. 24, 1945 we went down off the Island of Yap, still a Jap held Island, in fact our squadron had been bombing Yap and Nagulu. It was 2:30 PM and were concerned we would drift on to the Island. At 12:01 AM (Midnight)being pitch dark we noticed a large blacker image several feet ahead, there were no lights as we were in enemy territory. It was the Alvin C Cockrel (DE366) and at day light we also saw the Manlove (DE36) taking part. We were taken on board the Cockrel by climbing large nets. During the operation a Shipmate fell overboard but fortunately was rescued. I keep thinking some day I will hear from one of the crew but time is getting short. Any one out there. Bob Willig, Mechanicsburg Pa. 17055

Bob Willig Comments on August 13, 2006:

    The first pilot was Lt. Harold F. Strohoefer, pilot of the dead stick landing in the open sea. He is responsible for me being here today. Lt. Strohoefer who lived in Bayonne NJ, unfortunately passed away Oct. 7 1999.

    Alvin C. Cockrell escorted convoys between Eniwetok, Guam, Saipan, Ulithi, and Kossel Roads, and, when required, served as harbor patrol and air-sea rescue vessel. She carried out her first air-sea rescue mission on 23 February 1945, when she sailed from Ulithi to go to the assistance of a Martin PBM-3D "Mariner" flying boat from Patrol Bombing Squadron 22 that had been forced down by engine trouble. Underway at 1008, Alvin C. Cockrell proceeded at flank speed, guided to the scene by a "dumbo" plane overhead.

Click to Enlarge Pictures


This photo was taken about 1000 on the morning of 24 Feb 45 just prior to destroying the plane by gunfire. Note the damaged port wing. About 2330 (23 Feb 45), all crewmen were transferred to the Destroyer Escort USS Alvin C. Cockrell (DE 366) except for two who remained to handle lines for towing purposes. This photo was taken by Harry Epp, CM 1/C who also acted as the ship's official photographer.


1440--after conferring with the pilot, Lt. Stanhefer, USNR, and notifying the squadron commandere at Ulithi, the plane was destroyed by gunfire.

The following pictures and log book scans were supplied by Joyce Sullivan, the daughter of Thomas Hugh Murray. He was a crew member on the PBM-3D Martin Mariner that made an emergency water landing near Yap and almost floated within gun range of the Japanese before being rescued. Another page on his log book includes the note, "Jap Attack on Harbor - Suicide Dive Bombed a Carrier and Island - 21 Killed on CV - 5 Burned on Island". This is in regards to the March 1945 Japanese suicide mission against Ulithi that hit the USS Randolph in the harbor. In March 1945 twenty-four Yokosuka P1Y Ginga "Frances" attack bombers led by Lt Kuromaru Naoto (67th) took off on a one-way "tokko" (suicide) mission to Ulithi. Each Ginga carried a single 1,764-lb bomb. Eight hours after takeoff the Azusa Special Attack Unit descended through the overcast. As a result of a navigational error and unexpected head winds, they found themselves near Yap Island, 120 miles west of Ulithi. Three P1Ys of the Special Attack Unit arrived at Yap. One P1Y landed at the airfield. One P1Y failed in landing at the airfield and was damaged and one P1Y ditched off of Rumung. In 2006 we located the wreckage of the P1Y Ginda off of Rumung: http://www.missingaircrew.com/trip/un1/

Follow the Missing Air Crew Project On:
PIN IT


Post-war activities [ edit | edit source ]

Decommissioning [ edit | edit source ]

Relieved from duty with the 5th Fleet on 2 January 1946, Alvin C. Cockrell sailed for the United States. She touched briefly at Pearl Harbor on 14 January, and later proceeded thence to the west coast, reaching San Francisco, California, on 22 January. Decommissioned and placed in reserve at San Diego, California, on 2 July 1946, Alvin C. Cockrell remained inactive until returned to active duty with the buildup of the fleet during the Korean War.

Korean War [ edit | edit source ]

Recommissioned on 27 June 1951, Lt. Comdr. Thomas R. Pearson in command, Alvin C. Cockrell was assigned to Escort Squadron (CortRon) 3, and over the next two years served as a training ship for the Fleet Sonar School, San Diego. She conducted antisubmarine warfare (ASW) type-training exercises, and served as courier ship between San Diego and Long Beach, California.

Deploying to the western Pacific (WestPac) for the first time since the end of World War II, Alvin C. Cockrell sailed for the Far East in August 1953. She served as station ship at Hong Kong, for three months before she proceeded to the Philippine Islands and visited Sangley Point and Subic Bay. She also visited Bangkok, Thailand, during this deployment, and operated for two weeks in the Gulf of Siam, training sailors from the Thai Armed Forces Academy at Sattahip, in gunnery and engineering. Returning to San Diego by way of Guam, Midway Island, and Pearl Harbor, the destroyer escort reached San Diego in March 1954, and operated locally into the autumn of 1955. Her regular overhaul at the Long Beach Naval Shipyard, conducted during March and April 1955, punctuated that period of local operations, and saw the ship being converted for service as a flagship.

Deployed as CortRon 3 flagship [ edit | edit source ]

Deploying to the Far East again in October 1955, Alvin C. Cockrell was designated flagship of CortRon 3 in December 1955. During the course of this cruise, the ship participated in a wide variety of evolutions, ranging from hunter-killer exercises to covering U.S. Marine Corps amphibious landings and convoy escort duties. Her ports of call on this WestPac cruise encompassed Hong Kong, Keelung and Kaohsiung, Taiwan Okinawa and the Japanese ports of Atami, Sasebo and Yokosuka. Returning to San Diego at the end of March 1956, Alvin C. Cockrell spent the next nine months engaged in local operations out of that port, serving as sonar school ship and participating in several minor ASW training operations. Highlighting the latter period was the ship's participation in a fleet review at San Diego on 14 September 1956.

During 1957, Alvin C. Cockrell deployed to WestPac with CortRon 3, visiting the southern and western Pacific. During the course of this cruise, she visited Kwajalein Atoll, in the Marshalls Auckland, New Zealand Manus, in the Bismarck Archipelago Yokosuka, Japan Okinawa Kaohsiung Singapore Hong Kong Corregidor, Subic Bay, and Manila. She participated in exercise "Beacon Hill" in the Philippines a SEATO (South East Asia Treaty Organization) exercise, "Astra", in the Gulf of Siam and South China Sea with units of the British, Australian, New Zealand, French, and Thai Navies and spent a month on surveillance patrols in the Carolines, Marianas, and Bonins, visiting several islands famous in World War II: Guam, Ponape, Iwo Jima, Truk, Tinian, and Saipan. Returning to San Diego in early July, via Midway Island and Pearl Harbor, Alvin C. Cockrell underwent her regular overhaul at the Mare Island Naval Shipyard between October 1957 and January 1958.

For the first six months of 1958, the destroyer escort deployed to the central and western Pacific her ports of call included Yokosuka, Hong Kong, and Subic Bay. She participated in a joint Air Force-Navy Operation Handclasp project, a U.S. 7th Fleet weapons demonstration for Asian political and military leaders, and spent two of the six months in the Carolines, Marianas, and Bonins, on surveillance patrol. She returned to San Diego in mid-June 1958, via Midway Island and Pearl Harbor as in previous deployments.

Reassigned to Naval Reserve Training ship duties [ edit | edit source ]

After she had brought her fourth WestPac deployment to a close, Alvin C. Cockrell was assigned Naval Reserve Training (NRT) ship duties with Reserve Escort Squadron 1, on 1 July 1958, home-ported at San Francisco. Decommissioned on 17 January 1959, the ship was designated a Group II destroyer escort in the ASW surface component of the selected reserve and remained "in service" to provide underway training for her own selected reserve crew of inactive reserve officers and men. Two active duty officers and 36 enlisted men maintained the ship, and on the third weekend of each month, a reserve crew of 161 officers and men would embark to steam and train their own ship. For two weeks each year the reserve crew would embark, and, integrated with the active duty men, would carry out a two week reserve training cruise. In May 1959, the ship moved to her new home port, the Naval and Marine Corps Reserve Training Center at Alameda, California.

Recommissioned for Berlin Crisis of 1961 [ edit | edit source ]

For the next two years the ship maintained this routine, until the Berlin crisis in the autumn of 1961 resulted in a call-up of reserve units. In September 1961, President John F. Kennedy directed that all ASW surface components of the selected reserve forces report for active duty on 1 October 1961. Accordingly, Alvin C. Cockrell was recommissioned on 1 October 1961, Comdr. Robert A. Bush in command. After the ship underwent a routine overhaul, her home port was changed to Pearl Harbor. She sailed for Hawaii on 2 January 1962, and took part in a large-scale, opposed-entry exercise at Pearl Harbor ten days later.

Increased tensions in the Far East soon resulted in Alvin C. Cockrell's sailing for that area of the globe following refresher training, the destroyer escort departed Hawaiian waters on 24 February 1962 with CortDiv 72, which consisted of Alvin C. Cockrell (flagship), USS Vammen (DE-644), USS Marsh (DE-699) and USS Charles E. Brannon (DE-446). Proceeding to Subic Bay via Guam and Midway Island, Alvin C. Cockrell reported for duty with Task Force 72 upon arrival at Subic on 11 March 1962.

Vietnam War [ edit | edit source ]

One week later, on 18 March, Alvin C. Cockrell sailed for Da Nang, Republic of Vietnam, for operations with units of the South Vietnamese Navy. She conducted intensive training assistance with units of that force, improving general ship-to-shore communications and providing on-the-job training for Vietnamese sailors.

Visiting Hong Kong from 5 to 11 April 1962, Alvin C. Cockrell then proceeded to Subic Bay, for tender availability alongside USS Delta (AR-9). Following that period of repairs and upkeep, the destroyer escort sailed for the Gulf of Siam, and conducted operations there between 20 April and 2 May. She conducted a four-day port visit to Saigon, the capital of South Vietnam, and then returned to Subic Bay. Alvin C. Cockrell ultimately sailed for Yokosuka on 21 May, and then participated in exercises the first week of June. Proceeding via Midway Island, the destroyer escort reached Pearl Harbor on 18 June 1962, and commenced a two-week availability alongside the destroyer tender USS Bryce Canyon (AD-36).

Return to reserve duties [ edit | edit source ]

Sailing thence for San Francisco, California, Alvin C. Cockrell reached her destination on 17 July 1962, and was decommissioned on 1 August 1962, reverting to "in service" status as a Group II NRT ship. She remained in that status for the rest of her career. During 1963 her two-week active training cruise took her to Hawaiian waters. In 1964 she conducted intensive refresher training at San Diego, California. The cruise for August 1965 found the ship visiting the Canadian ports of Vancouver and Esquimalt. In 1966 she operated out of San Diego. In the summer of 1967, the ship visited Vancouver and Seattle, Washington, in the course of her two-week cruise.

Final inactivation and decommissioning [ edit | edit source ]

Decommissioned on 20 September 1968, Alvin C. Cockrell was struck from the Naval Vessel Register on 23 September 1968. Her hulk was subsequently utilized in weapons testing, and she was sunk on 19 September 1969.


Guadalcanal service [ edit | edit source ]

Within a week, the 1st Battalion, 7th Marines, was to conduct a reconnaissance in force of the region between the Matanikau River and the village of Kokumbona, led by Lieutenant Colonel Lewis B. "Chesty" Puller, USMC, and departed the perimeter of the marine defenses on September 23,. The point of Puller's battalion surprised elements of the Japanese Oka Detachment as they were sitting down cooking rice on the slopes of Mount Austen (Mambulo), late the following afternoon, September 24, south of Lunga Point. The sound of firing having alerted the enemy's main body, a brisk battle ensued as it developed, 1st Lt. Cockrell led his platoon in assaulting a strongly held Japanese position against heavy machine gun and rifle fire. He was killed in the ensuing action, one of seven marines who died in the engagement.


Alvin Cockrell DE-366 - History

Alvin Chester Cockrell, Jr., was killed by Japanese gunfire on September 24, 1942 in the South Pacific Island of Guadalcanal. Many of you remember his younger sister, Jim Alice Cockrell Perkins, wife of Dr. Peter B. Perkins, long time dentist in Hazlehurst. Even older members of the community may remember A.C. Cockrell, Sr., who was a dentist in Hazlehurst until his death in 1948, and his wife, Annie Cockrell, who often served as a substitute teacher in high school in the 1950s.

Chester Cockrell was born in September 1918, attended high school in Hazlehurst, played football and tennis and became interested in boxing. He was an active member of First Baptist Church. After graduating Chester enrolled in the University of Mississippi in the fall of 1936. He was in the Delta Psi Fraternity and during his sophomore year was made a member of the Cardinal Club, a leadership organization. Chester joined the Ole Miss Boxing Team. A boxing contest between Ole Miss and LSU occurred in late January 1939, and in the February 1, 1939 edition of the Memphis Commercial Appeal the sports columnist, Walter Stewart, captioned a section of his column, "A Red Badge of Courage for Chester Cockrell." While an undergraduate at Ole Miss, Chester enrolled in the Marine Corps Reserve and on June 20, 1940 became a 2nd Lieutenant. One of Chester's classmates at Ole Miss was John Med Miller, also of Hazlehurst, who had a distinguished career in the US Navy. After graduation Chester enrolled in medical school but his first term was interrupted by a call to active duty in the fall of 1940.

Very few people in the US had ever heard of Guadalcanal before the summer of 1942, when the Japanese military started building an airfield. The United States was determined to stop Japanese movement toward Australia, and between August 1942 and February 1943 US soldiers were locked in a continuous, deadly battle in which the Japanese were defeated with much loss of life on both sides. Before Guadalcanal the Japanese army in World War II had not been defeated. After Guadalcanal Japan never had a victory, and allied forces moved steadily across the Pacific to defeat Japan.

Chester Cockrell left the United States for the last time on April 10, 1942 from Norfolk, Virginia. By the summer of 1942 Chester, now a 1st Lieutenant, was in command of Company B First Battalion 7th Marines (B-1-7). He was first deployed to British Samoa and on September 18 was moved to Guadalcanal along with 4200 other troops. On September 24, 1942 Cockrell led his men on a patrol to the west of the vital airstrip, Henderson Field, and was killed. Chester Cockrell was awarded the Navy Cross which is the highest US Navy medal and second only to the Congressional Medal of Honor. The citation for Chester Cockrell is as follows:

"For extraordinary heroism and conspicuous devotion to duty in action against enemy Japanese forces near Mambule, Guadalcanal, Solomon Island, on 24 September 1942. In the face of hostile machine gun and rifle fire, First Lieutenant Cockrell, with utter disregard for his own personal safety, led his platoon in an assault against a strongly held enemy position, inflicting extremely heavy losses and contributed in a large pat to the defeat of the Japanese in this engagement. First Lieutenant Cockrell's outstanding courage and aggressive fighting spirit reflect great credit upon himself, his command and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave up his life in defense of his country."

As a memorial to Chester Cockrell, on August 8, 1944 the United States Navy commissioned the USS Alvin C. Cockrell (DE 366) a destroyer escort constructed at Orange, Texas. The ship was active in patrol, escort and rescue duty and took part in several Pacific campaigns including Okinawa. The USS Cockrell remained in active duty until August 1962 when it was decommissioned. In 1995 a history of the USS Alvin C. Cockrell was written by George L. Clark, Jr., of San Francisco. A copy of that history is in the Hazlehurst library.

Today, more than 65 years after the death of Chester Cockrell it is difficult for us to realize a time when Nazi Germany controlled most of Europe, and the Japanese military was moving unchecked across the South Pacific. It was only through the valor and sacrifice of countless allied soldiers in Europe, the Pacific Islands and elsewhere that World War II was brought to a successful conclusion. We can look at the Courthouse Military Monument in Hazlehurst to reflect on the names of those gallant young men who gave their last measure of devotion, their very lives.


Rescuing Japanese afloat in the water

The final month of the war, August 1945, began with Alvin C. Cockrell operating with the Palau Island Patrol and Escort Unit, keeping watch on the by-passed Palaus and the Japanese garrisons there. On 2 August, the ship departed her patrol station on orders to pick up two men from a raft reported by a patrol plane. The two turned out to be Japanese soldiers or laborers attempting to escape from Babelthuap and hoping for an American ship to pick them up. Alvin C. Cockrell turned them over to a small boat for transfer ashore, and resumed her patrol.


Alvin C. Cockrell, Jr.

When his battalion was ambushed in the late afternoon of 24 September, Cockrell coordinated a counterattack to relieve heavy pressure on A/1/7. He personally led one of his platoons in the assault, but was shot through the head and killed before reaching his objective.

Biography:
Coming soon. Contact the webmaster for more information about this Marine.

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to First Lieutenant Alvin Chester Cockrell, Jr. (MCSN: 0-6684), United States Marine Corps Reserve, for extraordinary heroism and conspicuous devotion to duty as Platoon Leader of the Second Platoon, Company B, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division, in action against enemy Japanese forces near Mambulo, Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands, on 24 September 1942. In the face of hostile machine gun and rifle fire, First Lieutenant Cockrell, with utter disregard for his own personal safety, led his platoon in an assault against a strongly-held enemy position, inflicting extremely heavy losses and contributing in a large part to the defeat of the Japanese in this engagement. First Lieutenant Cockrell’s outstanding courage and aggressive fighting spirit reflect great credit upon himself, his command and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave up his life in the defense of his country.

Articles & Records:

Second Lieutenant Cockrell, photographed for his service record book on 1 October 1940 Excerpt from the muster roll of B/1/7, September 1942. A sketch of “Hill Y” in the rugged terrain near Mount Austen. The graves, designated A through E, contained PFC Richard Wehr, Pvt. Joseph Karnaghon, Cpl. Manuel Pimentel, Cpl. John Edwinson, and 1Lt. Alvin Cockrell (marked)
The Clarion Ledger (Jackson, MS) 24 May 1943. Repeated searches were made to find the graves on Hill Y, but without success. The remains were declared non-recoverable in 1949.

Alvin Cockrell DE-366 - History

This page provides the hull numbers of all U.S. Navy escort ships numbered in the DE series from 200 through 399, with links to those ships with photos available in the Online Library.

See the list below to locate photographs of individual escort ships.

If the escort ship you want does not have an active link on this page, contact the Photographic Section concerning other research options.

Left Column --
Escort Ships numbered
DE-200 through DE-299:

  • DE-200 : Neuendorf (1943-1967)
  • DE-201 : James E. Craig (1943-1969)
  • DE-202 : Eichenberger (1943-1973)
  • DE-203 : Thomason (1943-1969)
  • DE-204 : Jordan (1943-1947)
  • DE-205 : Newman (1943-1966), later APD-59
  • DE-206 : Liddle (1943-1968), later APD-60
  • DE-207 : Kephart (1944-1967), later APD-61
  • DE-208 : Cofer (1944-1968), later APD-62
  • DE-209 : Lloyd (1944-1968), later APD-63


USS Alvin C. Cockrell, USS Walton, USS Ulvert M. Moore, USS Walter C. Wann, USS William Seiverling, USS Silverstein, USS Abercrombie, USS Tabberer, USS Samuel B. Roberts, USS Lewis, USS Stafford, USS John C. Butler, USS Woodson
Herausgeber: Source: Wikipedia

Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 85. Chapters: USS Alvin C. Cockrell, USS Walton, USS Ulvert M. Moore, USS Walter C. Wann, USS William Seiverling, USS Silverstein, USS Abercrombie, USS Tabberer, USS Samuel B. Roberts, USS Lewis, USS Stafford, USS John C. Butler, USS Woodson, USS McGinty, USS Richard W. Suesens, USS McCoy Reynolds, USS Naifeh, USS Edmonds, USS Robert F. Keller, USS Howard F. Clark, USS Goss, USS Tweedy, USS Douglas A. Munro, USS Gilligan, USS Conklin, USS Straus, USS Albert T. Harris, USS Johnnie Hutchins, USS Hanna, USS Maurice J. Manuel, USS Richard M. Rowell, USS Thaddeus Parker, …mehr


For Healthcare Professionals

Applies to flecainide: oral tablet

General

The Cardiac Arrhythmia Suppression Trial (CAST) revealed significantly higher mortality associated with flecainide in patients with a recent history (more than six days but less than two years prior to study) of myocardial infarction (MI) and non-life-threatening ventricular ectopy relative to placebo (5.1% versus 2.3%). The risk of death relative to placebo in patients with a recent history of Q-wave MI and non-Q-wave MI is 8.7 and 1.7, respectively. Use of flecainide in this context is potentially harmful.

Side effects are more likely when plasma flecainide concentrations are greater than 1.0 mcg/mL. [Ref]

Cardiovascular

Cardiovascular side effects including arrhythmias are the most serious side effects. Flecainide may cause or exacerbate arrhythmias in 1% of patients with preexisting paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia and in 7% of patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Flecainide may also exacerbate arrhythmias in 7% to 13% of patients with preexisting sustained or nonsustained ventricular arrhythmias.

Flecainide-induced arrhythmias include sinus bradycardia or arrest in 2%, bundle branch blocks in 1%, increased premature ventricular depolarizations in 1%, ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation in 0.5%, and sudden death in 0.2% of patients. New ventricular arrhythmias have been reported in 3.4% of patients.

Flecainide may cause prolongation of the PR, QRS, and corrected QT intervals. Most of the QT interval prolongation is attributable to widening of the QRS complex rather than prolongation of the JT interval. Rare cases of torsades de pointes have been reported.

Exacerbation of congestive heart failure is rare and only occurs in about 0.5% and 9% of patients with preexisting supraventricular arrhythmias and ventricular arrhythmias, respectively. Hypotension is almost exclusively associated with intravenous administration of flecainide. [Ref]

Risk factors for a proarrhythmic effect include underlying congenital or structural heart disease.

A case of "pseudoinfarction" has been reported in which flecainide induced a transient right bundle branch block with a focal block in the septal fibers of the left bundle branch system. An electrocardiogram (ECG) also revealed ST segment elevations and a Q-wave pattern, consistent with septal infarction. The patient did not have a myocardial infarction by enzyme studies, and the ECG abnormalities resolved after discontinuation of flecainide.

One patient with a history of ischemic congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction (MI), and ventricular arrhythmias developed profound cardiogenic shock without evidence of MI or a new or worsened ventricular arrhythmia. The associated serum flecainide concentration was 1.8 mcg/mL. [Ref]

Nervous system

Flecainide may exacerbate myasthenia gravis.

At least 6 cases of flecainide-induced peripheral neuropathy (sensory loss) have been reported and it appears to develop after prolonged use ( 2 to 10 years). Following discontinuation of flecainide therapy, symptoms (e.g., lower-extremity weakness and/or paresthesias, gait disturbance) resolved over 3 to 6 months. However, in some cases the neuropathy did not resolve after discontinuation of flecainide. [Ref]

Nervous system side effects, such as dizziness and visual disturbances (including blurred vision, decreased acuity, and scotomata) occur in 13% to 28% of patients who are taking flecainide doses of 400 mg per day. Transient headaches, asthenia, feelings of a thick tongue or lips, fatigue, paresthesias, and tremors have been reported in 2% to 10% of patients. [Ref]

Gastrointestinal

Gastrointestinal side effects include abdominal pain, nausea, and constipation in 1% to 4% of patients. Diarrhea occurs rarely. [Ref]

Musculoskeletal

A 33-year-old woman with atrial fibrillation, mitral valve prolapse, and a congenital muscle fiber disproportion myopathy developed muscle weakness which partially resolved after flecainide dosage reduction and completely resolved after substitution of flecainide with other antiarrhythmic agents. [Ref]

Musculoskeletal side effects including weakness has been reported and may be more likely in patients with underlying muscular disorders. [Ref]

Ocular

Ocular side effects are limited to rare cases of corneal deposits. [Ref]

High performance liquid chromatographic analysis of excised corneal deposits in one patient revealed opacities with the same chromatographic characteristics of flecainide. [Ref]

Genitourinary

Class I antiarrhythmic agents such as flecainide have local anesthetic and anticholinergic properties which may rarely cause urinary retention. [Ref]

Genitourinary side effects including complaints of impotence are reported in 4% of patients. A case of urinary retention associated with flecainide has been reported. [Ref]

Respiratory

A case of reversible flecainide-induced pneumonitis was reported in a 61-year-old man with a remote history of pulmonary tuberculosis. A complete infectious disease work-up was negative. Serial bronchial-alveolar lavages and chest radiographs were consistent with a drug-induced process. [Ref]

Respiratory side effects are extremely rare. [Ref]

Hematologic

One patient developed leukopenia after 5 months of flecainide therapy. The leukopenia resolved after drug discontinuation and did not recur when flecainide was reinstituted. The leukopenia may have been due to a concurrent viral infection. [Ref]

Hematologic side effects are extremely rare. [Ref]

Hepatic

Hepatic side effects including enzyme concentration elevations have been reported in rare cases. [Ref]

Psychiatric

Psychiatric side effects including paranoid psychosis was reported in a 62-year-old patient receiving flecainide for the treatment of malignant neuropathic pain. [Ref]

References

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2. Akiyama T, Pawitan Y, Greenberg H, et al "Increased risk of death and cardiac arrest from encainide and flecainide in patients after non-Q-wave acute myocardial infarction in the cardiac arrhythmia suppressi." Am J Cardiol 68 (1991): 1551-5

3. Tjandra-Maga TB, Verbesselt R, Van Hecken A, Mullie A, De Schepper PJ "Flecainide: single and multiple oral dose kinetics, absolute bioavailability and effect of food and antacid in man." Br J Clin Pharmacol 22 (1986): 309-16

4. Heisler BE, Ferrier GR "Proarrhythmic actions of flecainide in an isolated tissue model of ischemia and reperfusion." J Pharmacol Exp Ther 279 (1996): 317-24

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7. Anderson JL, Platt ML, Guarnieri T, Fox TL, Maser MJ, Pritchett ELC, Kay GN, Plumb VJ, Epstein AE, Bubien RS, Bhandari "Flecainide acetate far paroxysmal supraventricular tachyarrhythmias." Am J Cardiol 74 (1994): 578-84

8. Hopson JR, Buxton AE, Rinkenberger RL, Nademanee K, Heilman JM, Kienzle MG "Safety and utility of flecainide acetate in the routine care of patients with supraventricular tachyarrhythmias: results of a multicenter trial." Am J Cardiol 77 (1996): a72-82

9. Levine B, Chute D, Caplan YH "Flecainide intoxication." J Anal Toxicol 14 (1990): 335-6

10. Hohnloser SH, Zabel M "Short- and long-term efficacy and safety of flecainide acetate for supraventricular arrhythmias." Am J Cardiol 70 (1992): a3-10

11. Marcus FI "The hazards of using type 1C antiarrhythmic drugs for the treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation." Am J Cardiol 66 (1990): 366-7

12. Winkelmann BR, Leinberger H "Life-threatening flecainide toxicity." Ann Intern Med 106 (1987): 807-14

13. Karl M "Life-threatening flecainide toxicity." Ann Intern Med 107 (1987): 780

14. Roden DM "Risks and benefits of antiarrhythmic therapy." N Engl J Med 331 (1994): 785-91

15. Anderson JL "Long-term safety and efficacy of flecainide in the treatment of supraventricular tachyarrhythmias: the united states experience." Am J Cardiol 70 (1992): a11-8

16. Van Aubel KJJCM, Ruiter JH, Arnold AER, Burgersduk C "Pseudo infarction ECG pattern occurring during intravenous treatment with flecainide acetate." Eur Heart J 13 (1992): 137-9

17. Windle JR, Witt RC, Rozanski GJ "Effects of flecainide on ectopic atrial automaticity and conduction." Circulation 88 (1993): 1878-84

18. Said SAM, Somer ST, Luttikhuis HAO "Flecainide-induced JT prolongation, t wave inversion and ventricular tachycardia during treatment for symptomatic atrial fibrillation." Int J Cardiol 44 (1994): 285-7

19. Cockrell JL, Scheinman MM, Titus C, et al "Safety and efficacy of oral flecainide therapy in patients with atrioventricular re-entrant tachycardia." Ann Intern Med 114 (1991): 189-94

20. Chimienti M, Cullen MT, Casadei G "Safety of long-term flecainide and propafenone in the management of patients with symptomatic paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: report from the flecainide and propafenone italian study investigators." Am J Cardiol 77 (1996): a60-5

21. Forbes WP, Hee TT, Mohiuddin SM, Hillman DE "Flecainide-induced cardiogenic shock." Chest 94 (1988): 1121

22. Donovan KD, Power BM, Hockings BEF, Dobb G, Lee KY "Intravenous flecainide versus amiodarone for recent-onset atrial fibrillation." Am J Cardiol 75 (1995): 693-7

23. Puech P, Gagnol JP "Class IC drugs: propafenone and flecainide." Cardiovasc Drugs Ther 4 (1990): 549-53

24. Andrivet P, Beaslay V, Canh VD "Torsades de pointe with flecainide-amiodarone therapy." Intensive Care Med 16 (1990): 342-3

25. Fish FA, Gillette PC, Benson DW "Proarrhythmia, cardiac arrest and death in young patients receiving encainide and flecainide." J Am Coll Cardiol 18 (1991): 356-65

26. Strambabadiale M, Lazzarotti M, Facchini M, Schwartz PJ "Malignant arrhythmias and acute myocardial ischemia: interaction between flecainide and the autonomic nervous system." Am Heart J 128 (1994): 973-82

27. Psaty BM, Psaty SE "Flecainide toxicity in an older adult." J Am Geriatr Soc 57 (2009): 751-3

28. Aliot E, Denjoy I, Attuel, Admant, Rey, Janody, Richard, Lang, Valere, Morane, Kahn, Kayanakis, Janinmagnificat, Fauvel "Comparison of the safety and efficacy of flecainide versus propafenone in hospital out-patients with symptomatic paroxysmal atrial fibrillation/flutter." Am J Cardiol 77 (1996): a66-71

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30. Facchini M, Varisco T, Bonazzi O, et al "Efficacy and safety of flecainide in low-risk patients with chronic ventricular arrhythmias: a two-year follow-up." Am Heart J 117 (1989): 1258-64

31. Crozier I "Flecainide in the wolff-parkinson-white syndrome." Am J Cardiol 70 (1992): a26-32

32. Clementy J, Dulhoste MN, Laiter C, et al "Flecainide acetate in the prevention of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: a nine-month follow-up of more than 500 patients." Am J Cardiol 70 (1992): a44-9

33. Malesker MA, Sojka SG, Fagan NL "Flecainide-induced neuropathy." Ann Pharmacother 39 (2005): 1580-1

34. Pedersen KE, Christiansen BD, Kjaer K, Klitgaard NA, Nielsen-Kudsk F "Verapamil-induced changes in digoxin kinetics and intraerythrocytic sodium concentration." Clin Pharmacol Ther 34 (1983): 8-13

35. Hellestrand KJ "Efficacy and safety of long-term oral flecainide acetate in patients with responsive supraventricular tachycardia." Am J Cardiol 77 (1996): a83-8

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37. Moller HU, Thygesen K, Kruit PJ "Corneal deposits associated with flecainide." BMJ 302 (1991): 506-7

38. Ferrick KJ, Power M "Profound exacerbation of neuromuscular weakness by flecainide." Am Heart J 119 (1990): 414-5

39. Ziegelbaum M, Lever H "Acute urinary retention associated with flecainide." Cleve Clin J Med 57 (1990): 86-7

40. Akoun GM, Cadranel JL, Israel-Biet D, Gauthier-Rahman S "Flecainide-associated pneumonitis." Lancet 337 (1991): 49

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42. Bennett MI "Paranoid psychosis due to flecainide toxicity in malignant neuropathic pain." Pain 70 (1997): 93-4


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