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Crews of Rathburne, Talbot, Dent, Waters, Lea and Dorsey

Crews of Rathburne, Talbot, Dent, Waters, Lea and Dorsey


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Crews of Rathburne, Talbot, Dent, Waters, Lea and Dorsey

This panoramic view shows (from left to right) the crews of the Wickes class destroyer USS Rathburne (DD-113), USS Talbot (DD-114), USS Dent (DD-117), USS Waters (DD-115), USS Lea (DD-118) and USS Dorsey (DD-117), and was taken at San Diego on 22 October 1930.


After a Caribbean shakedown and a European cruise during the summer of 1919, Kilty returned to San Diego and operated there until she decommissioned 5 June 1922.

World War II Edit

Kilty recommissioned 18 December 1939, and in April 1940 sailed on Neutrality Patrol out of San Diego. During the summer, she conducted reserve training cruises and resumed her patrols early in September. The destroyer continued these operations until the United States entered World War II. Then, Kilty intensified ASW patrols, trained armed-guard crews for merchantmen, and escorted coastal convoys throughout 1942.

Reclassified APD-15 on 2 January 1943, Kilty cleared Mare Island 2 March for the South Pacific. After arriving Noumea 8 April with a Marine Raiders battalion, the transport steamed toward Guadalcanal as an ASW screen 28 April. She made similar cruises until June when she reported for patrol and escort duty in the Solomons. Kilty played a vital role in the conquest of the Solomons, landing troops of the 37th Division on New Georgia Island 30 June and 4 July. Continuing operations in the area, she made three reinforcement runs up the "Slot" during July and landed troops on Vella Lavella Island 15 August.

As Allied operations built up momentum, Kilty moved on to the Treasury Islands Campaign. She successfully landed New Zealand troops on Stirling Island 27 October and a Marine force on Bougainville 9 days later, enabling Allied Forces to bypass Rabaul. Kilty effectively aided this campaign in three more landings before sailing for Brisbane 21 November.

Returning Milne Bay in mid-December, the transport began preparing for the assault on the Bismarck Archipelago. Kilty landed units of the 7th Marine Regiment for the initial attack on Cape Gloucester, New Britain 26 December. Following two more landings there, she sent troops ashore at Saidor 2 January 1944 to take an air strip which would help the Air Force patrol and support Cape Gloucester. Kilty ' s next objective was Green Island, where she landed troops on 15 and 20 February before returning to Port Purvis on Florida Island in the Solomons.

Following an unopposed assault on Emirau Island 20 March, the transport prepared for the Hollandia campaign. Completing landings at Aitape 22 April, Kilty then participated in New Guinea landings, including Wakde 17 May and Biak 10 days later before putting into Humboldt Bay 28 May.

After a minor overhaul at Milne Bay, she landed troops on Cape Sansopor 30 July before sailing to Sydney. Returning to Humboldt Bay 30 August, Kilty landed troops on Morotai 15 September to complete her operations in New Guinea area. Kilty departed Hollandia 12 October as part of the spearhead for the giant Leyte assault that bore down on the enemy like a typhoon. In the advance assault force she landed rangers on Dinagat in the entrance to Leyte Gulf 17 October to pave the way for the main Philippine invasion. While Kilty was returning to Hollandia 23 October, the U.S. Fleet was crushing the Japanese Navy in the famous battle for Leyte Gulf.

During another cruise to Leyte in mid-November, the transport splashed two Aichi D3A "Vals" before they could crash into American LSTs. Continuing operations in the strategic Philippines, Kilty landed troops 15 December in the invasion of Mindoro, and on 11 January 1945 supported the Luzon landings. She made additional landings at Nasugbu 31 January and at Corregidor in mid-February before sailing for Ulithi 25 February for overhaul.

Battle-proven Kilty cleared Ulithi 2 April as escort to four escort carriers ferrying planes to the Okinawa beachhead. During May she made another escort cruise from Saipan to Okinawa, and on the 4th rescued survivors from Luce sunk during a kamikaze attack. With the Okinawa campaign well under way, Kilty departed Guam 17 May and arrived San Diego 18 June for overhaul. Redesignated DD-137 on 20 July 1945, Kilty was still in the yard as the war came to an end. The veteran destroyer decommissioned 2 November 1945, and was sold 26 August 1946 to the National Metal & Steel Corporation for scrapping.


Contents

Dent was launched 23 March 1918 by William Cramp & Sons, Philadelphia sponsored by Miss A. W. Collins, great-granddaughter of Captain Dent and commissioned 9 September 1918, Commander B. C. Allen in command.

Dent escorted a convoy to Ireland between 19 September and 8 November 1918, and then carried out training at Guantanamo Bay. On 1 May 1919 she got underway from New York to serve on station off Trepassey Harbor, Newfoundland, during the historic first aerial crossing of the Atlantic, a feat accomplished by a Navy seaplane. She returned to Newport on the 24th, and on 20 June she joined the escort for the yacht Imperator, carrying the President of Brazil from New York to Newport.

Dent arrived at San Pedro, California, 6 August 1919 to join the Pacific Fleet. She cruised to Hawaii as escort for New York with the Secretary of the Navy embarked in August, then steamed to Seattle for a Fleet Review in September. She returned to San Diego 22 September and went into reserve. She was placed in active commission again 14 December 1920, and operated with 50 percent of her complement on gunnery and torpedo practice, and in fleet maneuvers. She made a cruise to South America from 7 January to 11 March 1921, visiting Valparaíso, Chile Costa Rica and various ports in Mexico. Dent was placed out of commission in reserve 7 June 1922.

Recommissioned 15 May 1930, Dent acted as plane guard for carrier operations, trained reservists, and sailed for a fleet problem in the Caribbean and a visit to the United States East Coast from April to November 1934. On 18 December, she entered the Rotating Reserve at San Diego and tested ordnance until returning to active commission 10 June 1935. Dent operated along the United States West Coast and in the Hawaiian Islands until the United States entered World War II. At San Diego on 7 December 1941, she got underway the next day to screen Saratoga in her high speed run to Pearl Harbor.

World War II Edit

Returning to San Francisco 29 December 1941, Dent had duty with the Sound School at San Diego and operated along the U.S. West Coast on convoy duty until 27 April 1942 when she sailed for Alaskan waters. From 8 May she operated out of Dutch Harbor on convoy and patrol duty, escorting transports for the invasion of Adak 1 September. She returned to Seattle 30 January 1943 for repairs and conversion to a high-speed transport. She was reclassified APD-9, 7 March 1943.

Dent arrived at Noumea, New Caledonia 20 April 1943. She operated from this base and Espiritu Santo, landing troops in the assaults on New Georgia, Rendova, Vella Lavella, and Cape Torokina, Bougainville. After overhaul at Sydney, Australia, in November, she returned to Milne Bay, New Guinea on 17 December. While training at Cape Sudest 5 days later, she grounded on an uncharted shoal. Serious structural damage necessitated her return to Australia for repairs through January 1944.

Dent arrived at Nouméa 7 February 1944 and landed men of the 4th Marines on Emirau Island 20 March. From Milne Bay, New Guinea, she carried soldiers to the Aitape landings 22 April. Sailing from New Guinea 9 May, she returned to the Solomons to train an underwater demolition team for the invasion of the Marianas. She carried her team to Roi where they were transferred for transportation to Guam, then escorted Mazama to Saipan to carry emergency supplies of ammunition to the bombardment ships. Dent patrolled off Saipan and Tinian until early July when she escorted transports to Eniwetok and sailed for overhaul at San Diego, arriving 3 August.

From 8 November 1944 until the end of the war, Dent served with the Amphibious Training Force, Pacific Fleet, at San Diego. She sailed 20 October 1945 for the U.S. East Coast, arriving at Philadelphia 6 November. Dent was decommissioned there 4 December 1945 and sold 13 June 1946.

Dent received five battle stars for World War II service.

As of 2012, no other ships of this name have served in the United States Navy.


Contents

Cole sailed from New York 30 June 1919, to join U.S. Naval Forces in Turkish waters. For the next year they aided in the evacuation of refugees fleeing turmoil and war in the Middle East and showed the flag in the eastern Mediterranean and Black Seas, returning to New York City on 4 June 1920. It cruised in East Coast and Caribbean waters until decommissioned at Philadelphia Naval Shipyard on 10 July 1922.

Recommissioned on 1 May 1930, Cole joined the Scouting Fleet in the Atlantic. Once again it cruised along the east coast and in the Caribbean and took part in training exercises. From 22 October 1932 to 24 March 1933, Cole was in reduced commission at Norfolk Naval Shipyard as part of a rotating reserve squadron. On 4 April 1933, the destroyer participated in the fruitless search for survivors of the wreck of the airship Akron. From 3 February to 14 August 1934, the ship was again reduced to the rotating reserve squadron.

On 15 August 1934, Cole was assigned to the Scouting Force in the Pacific, and following maneuvers in the Caribbean reached its new base at San Diego, California on 9 November. It remained in the Pacific until 24 May 1936, and then reported to New York as a Naval Reserve training ship. She arrived at Philadelphia Naval Shipyard on 25 September and was decommissioned there on 7 January 1937.

Recommissioned 16 October 1939, Cole joined the Neutrality Patrol in the Atlantic. From 10 June 1941, she escorted convoys to Newfoundland and Iceland making five such voyages by 28 January 1942. From 14 March to 28 September, the destroyer patrolled and escorted convoys along the east coast, making one convoy run to the Virgin Islands. She put to sea from Norfolk, Virginia on 24 October for the invasion of North Africa on 8 November during which she landed 175 men of the 47th Infantry under fire on a pier at Safi, Morocco. Cole received the Presidential Unit Citation for her performance in this mission. Returning to Boston on 1 December, she resumed convoy duty and between 18 December 1942 and 16 February 1943, she operated between the east coast, Newfoundland, and Nova Scotia, then made a voyage to Gibraltar in March. The destroyer returned to the Mediterranean, reaching Mers El Kébir, Algeria on 23 May.

Along with patrol and escort duties in the Western Mediterranean, Cole took part in the Allied Invasion of Sicily on 10 July 1943, acting with a British submarine as a beach identification group, and later guarded transports during the assault on Salerno on 9 September. She returned to Charleston, South Carolina for overhaul on 24 December, after which she resumed convoy escort duty along the east coast and in the Caribbean, making one voyage to Casablanca in March 1944. On 3 December 1944, she began duty as a plane guard for aircraft carriers conducting air operations out of Quonset Point, Rhode Island, which continued until 31 August 1945. She was reclassified AG-116 on 30 June 1945. Cole was decommissioned on 1 November 1945, and sold 6 October 1947.

In addition to the Presidential Unit Citation, Cole received three battle stars for World War II service.


Crews of Rathburne, Talbot, Dent, Waters, Lea and Dorsey - History

USS DORSEY (DD-117)
Ship's History

Source: Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships (Published 1963)

Dorsey (DD-117) was launched 9 April 1918 by William Cramp & Sons, Philadelphia, PA, sponsored by Mrs. A. Means, distant relative of Midshipman Dorsey and commissioned 16 September 1918, Commander G. F. Neal in command.

Dorsey sailed with a merchant convoy from Philadelphia 20 September 1918, escorted it to Ireland, and returned to New York 19 October. Between 28 October and 20 November, she voyaged on escort duty to the Azores, then operated locally out of New York until 13 January 1919 when she got underway for target practice and fleet maneuvers in Cuban waters, returning 2 March. Three days later she sailed to escort George Washington with President Woodrow Wilson embarked as far as the Azores, returning to Guantanamo Bay 21 March to join the Fleet for maneuvers.

Dorsey sailed from Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, 9 April 1919, and arrived at Valetta, Malta, 26 April to report to Commander, Adriatic Squadron, for duty in the execution of the terms of the armistice with Austria. She served in the Mediterranean until 9 July when she proceeded to New York arriving on the 21st.

Dorsey sailed from New York with her division 17 September 1919 for the west coast, arriving at San Diego 12 October. She joined in fleet maneuvers in the Canal Zone and operated with seaplanes at Valparaiso, Chile, until clearing San Diego 25 June 1921 to join the Asiatic Fleet.

Dorsey arrived at Cavite, Philippine Islands, 24 August 1921, and served in experimental submarine practice and long-range battle and torpedo practice. On 3 June 1922 she sailed from Manila to call at Shanghai and Chefoo, China, Nagasaki, Japan, and Pearl Harbor on her passage to San Francisco where she arrived 2 October. She was placed out of commission at San Diego 9 March 1923.

Recommissioned 1 March 1930 Dorsey operated on the west coast, in the Canal Zone, and in the Hawaiian Islands acting as plane guard for carriers and participating in tactical maneuvers with the fleet. In reserve from 10 to 29 June 1936, she then entered Mare Island Navy Yard for the installation of gear for her new assignment as a high-speed towing vessel.

Dorsey continued to operate from San Diego providing high-speed target towing for ships in training along the west coast, in the Canal Zone, and, between 29 December 1938 and 25 April 1939, in the Caribbean. From 3 July 1940 she was based at Pearl Harbor. She entered Pearl Harbor Navy Yard 6 November for conversion to a high speed minesweeper and was reclassified DMS-1 on 19 November 1940.

When the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor 7 December 1941, Dorsey was at sea with TF 3 bound for Johnson Island. The force returned to its base on the 9th, and Dorsey was assigned to the Hawaiian Sea Frontier for patrol, local escort, and training duty. Except for overhaul at San Francisco from 1 January to 11 February 1943, she remained on this duty until 24 September 1943.

After scouting convoys to Efate, New Hebrides, and Noumea, New Caledonia, Dorsey sailed to the Solomon Islands for patrol and minesweeping operations. She swept and patrolled off Cape Torokina, Bougainville, and screened transports during the landings of 1 November, returning on 8 and 13 November with reinforcement and supply convoys. She escorted from her base at Port Purvis to Neoumea until 29 March 1944, then screened transports between Port Purvis, Kwajalein, Manus, and New Georgia until arriving at Majuro 12 May for duty towing targets at high speed for ships in training. From 20 June to 9 July she guarded convoys between Kwajalein and Eniwetok, then escorted Makin Island (CVE-93) to Pearl Harbor, and proceeded to San Francisco for overhaul.

Returning to Pearl Harbor 1 October 1944 Dorsey had towing duty and joined in minesweeping experiments until 9 November when she got underway as convoy escort for Port Purvis. On 1 December she arrived at Manus for minesweeping operations until 23 December. Continuing to San Pedro Bay, Leyte, Dorsey sortied on 2 January 1945 for the invasion of Lingayen Gulf. During the preinvasion minesweeping she accounted for several attacking planes and rescued five survivors from stricken LCI(G) 70.

Dorsey arrived off Iwo Jima for preinvasion minesweeping 16 February 1945. She patrolled during the assault landings, and towed bomb-damaged Gamble (DM-15) to safety 18 February, She sailed from Iwo Jima 1 March for Ulithi to prepare for the invasion of Okinawa, where she arrived 25 March to sweep mines. On the 27th she was struck a glancing blow by a suicide plane which killed three of her crew and wounded two. Dorsey remained on duty, screening assault shipping during the landings of 1 April and patrolling until the 4th when she departed for Pearl Harbor and battle damage repairs.

Returning to Okinawa 1 July 1945 Dorsey joined the minesweeping unit operating in conjunction with the 3d Fleet raids on the Japanese home islands. She sailed on 14 September for minesweeping operations in the Van Diemen Straits, returning to Okinawa five days later. On 9 October she was grounded by a severe typhoon. Decommissioned 8 December 1946, her battered hulk was destroyed 1 January 1946.


Crews of Rathburne, Talbot, Dent, Waters, Lea and Dorsey - History

This page features additional views related to USS Elliot (Destroyer # 146, later DD-146, DMS-4 & AG-104).

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

USS Elliot (DD-146) , lower left

At anchor with other destroyers, 23 April 1919.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 72KB 740 x 550 pixels

Trans-Atlantic Flight of the "NC" Aircraft, May 1919

Diagram of the sixth, and final, leg of the flight of the NC-4 aircraft, from Lisbon, Portugal, to Plymouth, England, during 30-31 May 1919. It also shows the positions of the ten U.S. Navy destroyers stationed along the way.
Printed by the Matthews-Northrup Works, Buffalo, New York.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 142KB 485 x 925 pixels

Destroyers in the Middle Chambers, Gatun Locks

During the Pacific Fleet's passage through the Panama Canal, 24 July 1919.
Those in the front center are (left to right): USS Waters (Destroyer # 115)
USS Dent (Destroyer # 116) and
USS Boggs (Destroyer # 136).
USS Yarnall (Destroyer # 143) is by herself just aft of that group.
Partially visible at right are (left to right): USS Elliot (Destroyer # 146)
USS Buchanan (Destroyer # 131) and
USS Philip (Destroyer # 76).
Two of the three ships just astern of that group are:
USS Tarbell (Destroyer # 142), right, and
USS Wickes (Destroyer # 75), left.
Photographed by the Panama Canal Company (their photo # 80-C-5).

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Commandr Photograph.

Online Image: 126KB 740 x 565 pixels

Destroyers in the Upper Chambers, Gatun Locks

During the Pacific Fleet's passage through the Panama Canal, 24 July 1919. Those present are:
USS Wickes (Destroyer # 75) and
USS Yarnall (Destroyer # 143), both at left
USS Philip (Destroyer # 76),
USS Buchanan (Destroyer # 131) and
USS Elliot (Destroyer # 146), left to right in the center group
USS Boggs (Destroyer # 136),
USS Dent (Destroyer # 116) and
USS Waters (Destroyer # 115), left to right in the right center group.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 103KB 740 x 555 pixels

Thirteenth Destroyer Division

Officers & Crews on board their ships in San Diego Harbor, California, 6 December 1919. Signalmen are sending semaphore messages from atop the ships' bridges.
Panoramic photograph by O.A. Tunnell, Masonic Temple Building, San Diego.
Ships present are (from left to right): Upshur (Destroyer # 144), Greer (Destroyer # 145), Elliot (Destroyer # 146), Aaron Ward (Destroyer # 132), Buchanan (Destroyer # 131) and Philip (Destroyer # 76).

Donation of Captain W.D. Puleston, USN (Retired), 1965.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 107KB 1200 x 275 pixels

Destroyers refitting at the Mare Island Navy Yard, California

View taken circa 1921-22. Many of these ships are being modified to place the after 4"/50 gun atop an enlarged after deckhouse. Ships present are identified in Photo # NH 50325 (complete caption).

Collection of Rear Admiral Ammen Farenholt, USN (MC), 1932.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 114KB 740 x 510 pixels

"Red Lead Row", San Diego Destroyer Base, California

Photographed at the end of 1922, with at least 65 destroyers tied up there. Many of the ships present are identified in Photo # NH 42539 (complete caption).

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 159KB 740 x 515 pixels

Making a smokescreen while participating in Fleet maneuvers during the 1930s.

Courtesy of PHC John Highfill, USN (Retired).

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 107KB 740 x 590 pixels

Moored together at Balboa, Panama Canal Zone, circa April 1934. Photographed by Stahl.
Destroyers present include (from right to left):
USS William B. Preston (DD-344)
USS Preble (DD-345)
USS Crowninshield (DD-134)
USS Buchanan (DD-131)
USS Aaron Ward (DD-132)
USS Dent (DD-116)
USS Waters (DD-115)
USS Talbot (DD-114)
USS Rathburne (DD-113)
USS Lea (DD-118)
USS Dorsey (DD-117)
USS Hale (DD-133)
USS Roper (DD-147)
USS Elliot (DD-146)
USS Detroit (CL-8) is in the right background.
Note bands painted on the after smokestacks of William B. Preston and Preble .

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Commandr Photograph.

Online Image: 88KB 740 x 585 pixels

Balboa Harbor, Panama Canal Zone

Aerial photograph taken 23 April 1934, with U.S. Fleet cruisers and destroyers moored together.
Most of the ships present are identified in Photo # 80-G-455906 (extended caption).

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Online Image: 298KB 1200 x 970 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

USS Elliot (AG-104, ex-DD-146 & DMS-4)

Ship's Decommissioning Party, held at Wilmington, California, 21 September 1945.
Photographed by Weaver.


Service history [ edit | edit source ]

After shakedown in South Atlantic waters, Herbert trained in the Caribbean until 1 May 1920, returning there 20 July with the Atlantic Fleet destroyer squadron. Herbert participated in torpedo practices, antiaircraft drills, and short range battle practice along the east coast. She decommissioned at Philadelphia 27 June 1922.

Herbert recommissioned 1 May 1930 and joined the Scouting Fleet at Newport, Rhode Island. For the next 4 years she operated in both East and West Coast waters, playing important roles in annual fleet problems and battle practice. From 16 January 1935 until August 1939, Herbert served as a training ship for Naval Reserves and midshipmen. As war swept across Europe, she sailed to Portugal via the Azores 2 October 1939 and remained there until July 1940.

Returning to the States, the destroyer underwent overhaul and 10 October reported to New London for sound school training. Herbert ' s training kept pace with the steadily intensifying war in Europe as she spent most of 1941 in battle practice, torpedo drills, and antisubmarine work.

World War II [ edit | edit source ]

With America's entry into the war, Herbert operated as a convoy escort along the American coast from Key West north to Halifax and Iceland. Guiding virtually defenseless merchant ships through coastal and Caribbean waters patrolled by U-boats, Herbert carried out frequent depth-charge attacks on marauding submarines. From April through June 1943 she visited Gibraltar and North Africa, as the build-up for the invasion of Sicily intensified. A hunter-killer patrol followed. After a second patrol, Herbert escorted a convoy from Bermuda to Casablanca, returning to Charleston 22 November 1943 for conversion to a high-speed transport.

Convoys escorted [ edit | edit source ]

Convoy Escort Group Dates Notes
HX 165 17-24 Dec 1941 Ώ] from Newfoundland to Iceland
ON 51 2-11 Jan 1942 ΐ] from Iceland to Newfoundland
HX 172 28 Jan-4 Feb 1942 Ώ] from Newfoundland to Iceland
ON 65 12-19 Feb 1942 ΐ] from Iceland to Newfoundland

Auxiliary service [ edit | edit source ]

Herbert now APD-22 sailed for the Pacific, reaching San Diego for amphibious training and continuing on to Cape Sudest, New Guinea, via Pearl Harbor 23 March 1944. She disembarked troops for the initial invasion at $3, 22 April and then spent a month on convoy escort duty before landing troops for the invasion of Biak Island 27 May. Landings at Warsai in the Cape Sansapor area 30 July followed further patrol and escort duty, and 15 September found Herbert off Morotai. Troops landed under naval cover to secure the airfield, which was within easy striking distance of the Philippines, next major step in the island-hopping war across the Pacific. On 17 October, 2 days before the initial landings at Leyte Gulf, Herbert landed Rangers on Homonhon Island which controlled the entrance to the Gulf. The destroyer remained in the Philippines, under almost constant Japanese air attack, throughout the rest of 1944 and, in January 1945, landed support troops at Lingayen Gulf.

From the Philippines, Herbert moved north for escort duty to Iwo Jima, returning to Leyte 18 March 1945 to prepare for the invasion of Okinawa, the largest amphibious operation of the Pacific war. Arriving Okinawa 31 March, the day before the initial landings, Herbert took up patrol and escort duties. Kamikaze attacks wounded ships all around her, but Herbert remained untouched. After two runs escorting convoys from back staging areas up to Okinawa, the destroyer headed home, reaching San Diego 19 June. Herbert was decommissioned at San Diego on 25 September 1945, stricken from the Naval Vessel Register on 24 October 1945 and sold for scrap to the Boston Metal Company of Baltimore in Maryland on 23 May 1946. Α]


Crews of Rathburne, Talbot, Dent, Waters, Lea and Dorsey - History

USS Aaron Ward , a 1090-ton Wickes class destroyer built at Bath, Maine, was commissioned in April 1919. Her first active mission was to help cover the May 1919 trans-Atlantic flight of the Navy's NC flying boats. In September 1919 the destroyer went to the Pacific where, in November, she helped salvage an Army plane that had crashed off Mexico and recovered the bodies of its crew. She was designated DD-132 in July 1920 and remained active in the eastern Pacific for the next two years. In February 1921 she rescued the survivors of USS Woolsey (DD-77) after that destroyer was sunk in a collision. Aaron Ward was decommissioned at San Diego, California, in June 1922.

Following almost a decade in reserve Aaron Ward recommissioned May 1930. She served both with the active fleet and as part of the Rotating Reserve until April 1937, when she was again laid up. The outbreak of the Second World War in September 1939 brought Aaron Ward back into commissioned service. She spent the next year operating in the Pacific and in the Caribbean area as part of the Neutrality Patrol. In September 1940 USS Aaron Ward was transferred to the United Kingdom as part of the Destroyers for Bases agreement.

Serving in the Royal Navy as HMS Castleton , the now-elderly destroyer was assigned primarily to North Atlantic convoy escort duties, though she also screened minelaying forces off Scotland. She rescued survivors of two torpedoed merchant ships on 21 November 1940, helped capture the crew of the sunken German submarine U-464 in August 1942 and, nearly a year later, rescued survivors of a downed Canadian patrol plane and of German submarine U-489 . HMS Castleton paid off in March 1945, as the European War was nearing an end. She was scrapped in Scotland in 1947.

USS Aaron Ward was named in honor of Rear Admiral Aaron Ward, USN, (1851-1918), who served actively in the U.S. Navy from 1867 to 1913.

This page features all the views we have related to USS Aaron Ward (Destroyer # 132, later DD-132).

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

USS Aaron Ward (Destroyer # 132)

Off the Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine, 10 April 1919.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 56KB 740 x 580 pixels

USS Aaron Ward (Destroyer # 132)

At Boston, Massachusetts, 23 April 1919.
Panoramic photograph by J. Crosby, Naval Photographer, 11 Portland St., Boston, Mass.

Courtesy of the Naval Historical Foundation. Crosby Collection.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 51KB 740 x 305 pixels

Photographed during the early 1920s, probably off the U.S. West Coast.
USS Buchanan (DD-131) is at left.

Courtesy of ESKC Joseph L. Aguillard, USNR, 1969.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 83KB 740 x 490 pixels

USS Anthony (DD-172) (center)
and
USS Aaron Ward (DD-132) (left)

Photographed circa the early 1920s, probably in San Diego harbor, California.
An oiler is visible behind Aaron Ward .

Courtesy of Jack Howland, 1985.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 63KB 740 x 470 pixels

Underway, probably during the 1930s.

Courtesy of Donald M. McPherson, 1969.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 86KB 740 x 435 pixels

Trans-Atlantic Flight of the "NC" Aircraft, May 1919

Diagram of the third leg of the flight of the NC-1, NC-3 and NC-4 aircraft, between Trepassy Bay, Newfoundland, and the Azores, during 16 May to 20 May 1919. It also shows the positions of the 21 U.S. Navy destroyers stationed along the way.
Printed by the Matthews-Northrup Works, Buffalo, New York.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 109KB 900 x 605 pixels

USS Aaron Ward (Destroyer # 132)

An officer and two sailors stand watch over the flag-draped caskets of Army Lieutenants Cecil H. Connolly and Waterhouse Weiser, on board the destroyer in November 1919.
The two Army fliers were killed when their plane crashed while searching for other lost aviators in Mexico.

Courtesy of the San Francisco Maritime Museum, San Francisco, California, 1969.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 85KB 590 x 765 pixels

Thirteenth Destroyer Division

Officers & Crews on board their ships in San Diego Harbor, California, 6 December 1919. Signalmen are sending semaphore messages from atop the ships' bridges.
Panoramic photograph by O.A. Tunnell, Masonic Temple Building, San Diego.
Ships present are (from left to right): Upshur (Destroyer # 144), Greer (Destroyer # 145), Elliot (Destroyer # 146), Aaron Ward (Destroyer # 132), Buchanan (Destroyer # 131) and Philip (Destroyer # 76).

Donation of Captain W.D. Puleston, USN (Retired), 1965.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 107KB 1200 x 275 pixels

USS Kanawha (AO-1) with thirteen destroyers alongside, off San Diego, California, during the early 1920s.
Photographed by Bunnell, 414 E Street, San Diego.
Ships present are identified in Photo # NH 98029 (complete caption).
Collection of Chief Quartermaster John Harold, USN.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 86KB 740 x 465 pixels

"Red Lead Row", San Diego Destroyer Base, California

Photographed at the end of 1922, with at least 65 destroyers tied up there. Many of the ships present are identified in Photo # NH 42539 (complete caption).

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 159KB 740 x 515 pixels

Moored together at Balboa, Panama Canal Zone, circa April 1934. Photographed by Stahl.
Destroyers present include (from right to left):
USS William B. Preston (DD-344)
USS Preble (DD-345)
USS Crowninshield (DD-134)
USS Buchanan (DD-131)
USS Aaron Ward (DD-132)
USS Dent (DD-116)
USS Waters (DD-115)
USS Talbot (DD-114)
USS Rathburne (DD-113)
USS Lea (DD-118)
USS Dorsey (DD-117)
USS Hale (DD-133)
USS Roper (DD-147)
USS Elliot (DD-146)
USS Detroit (CL-8) is in the right background.
Note bands painted on the after smokestacks of William B. Preston and Preble .


Hope you history buffs can help USN WW I Four Stack DDs to AVD, APD and possibly AGP Info request

Nov 26, 2017 #1 2017-11-26T14:47

Underway at 10:30 today so I got to make this quick.
Not sure this si the right place but you guys seem to be real history buffs.

I am looking for detailed info on the conversion of USN WW I Four Stack DDs to AVD, APD and possibly AGP . I know they lost a funnel and Torpedo tubes but I am looking for exactly what else they lost and exactly what replaced those parts. Deatils such as how many fire rooms and engine rooms remained and how they reallocated the space to accommodate their new missions would be very helpful.

Nov 26, 2017 #2 2017-11-26T18:53

Unfortunatly my books are in NZ and i am in the UK working a contract, but i have cut and pasted a section on the modification of Clemson class destroyers from navypedia, if i recall from the books a boiler/s (sacrificing a boiler room) was traded for more fuel storage and accommadation ,amongst otherthings, original fuel load 225t

Modernizations: 1930s, all survived: - (1 - 2) x 1 - 76/23 Mk XIV + 1 x 1 - 76/23 Mk XIV, 2 x 1 - 12.7/90
1937, DM Tracy, Preble, Sicard, Pruitt: - 4 x 3 - 533 TT, 1 DCT + 80 mines
1938, Childs, Williamson 1939, Clemson, Goldsborough, George E. Badger, Hulbert, William B. Preston 1940, McFarland, Belknap, Osmond Ingram, Gillis, Greene, Ballard, Thornton: were converted to seaplane tenders: 2 boilers and its funnels were removed (with following data: 1202/1699t, 12500-13500hp, 25kt, 429t oil, 101 pers., 2 x 1 - 102/50 Mk 9, 4 x 1 - 12.7/90, seaplanes)
1940, DMS Chandler, Southard, Hovey, Long, Hopkins, Zane, Wasmuth, Trever, Perry: - 4 x 1 - 102/50, 1 x 1 - 76/23, 4 x 3 - 533 TT, 1 DCT (Y-gun) + 4 x 1 - 76/50 Mk 20, 2 x 1 - 12.7/90, (2 - 4) DCT, sweeps, one boiler was removed (25kt max)

1941 - 1942, Dallas, Broome, McLeish, Simpson, McCormick, Truxtun, Overton, Sturtevant, Reuben James, Bainbridge, Decatur: - 4 x 1 - 102/50, 1 x 1 - 76/23, 2 x 3 - 533 TT + 6 x 1 - 76/50 Mk 20, 2 x 1 - 12.7/90

1942, Brooks, Gilmer, Humphreys, Sands 1943, Kane, Overton, Noa 1944, Clemson, Goldsborough, George E. Badger, Barry, Belknap, Osmond Ingram, Greene were converted to fast transport with data as follows:

nearly sister-ship McKean 1942

Displacement standard, t 1315
Displacement full, t 1793
Length, m 95.7
Breadth, m 11.3
Draught, m 3.76
No of shafts 2
Machinery Westinghouse geared steam turbines, 2 White-Forster boilers
Power, h. p. 13000
Max speed, kt 22 - 24
Fuel, t oil 429
Endurance, nm(kts)
Armament APD10 - 13: presumably 3 x 1 - 76/50 Mk 20, 6 x 1 - 20/70 Mk 4, 4 DCT, 2 DCR
APD18, 23, 24, 29, 31 - 36: presumably 3 x 1 - 76/50 Mk 20, 1 x 2 - 40/56 Mk 1/2, 5 x 1 - 20/70 Mk 4, 4 DCT, 2 DCR
Military load 4 LCP(L) or LCP(R) landing craft, 144 troops
Complement 101

Nov 26, 2017 #3 2017-11-26T21:15

Norman Friedman's "U.S. Destroyers, An Illustrated Design History" is probably your best bet. I don't have access to that book, but here are some online links, hope they help. Navypedia.org is a great resource. Klikzrulz posted the Navypedia data for the Clemson class here is the link and data for the Wickes class (almost identical): http://navypedia.org/ships/usa/us_dd_wickes.htm

Modernizations: 1918 - 1919, all destroyers early completed: - 1 x 1 - 76/23 or 2 x 1 - 37/43 + (1 - 2) x 1 - 76/23 Mk XIV
1920, DM Stribling, Murray, Israel, Luce, Maury, Lansdale, Mahan, Hart, Ingraham, Ludlow, Burns, Anthony, Sproston, Rizal 1930, Gamble 1931, Montgomery, Breese, Ramsay: - (1 - 2) x 1 - 76/23, 4 x 3 - 533 TT, 1 DCT + 80 mines
1930s, all survived: + 2 x 1 - 12.7/90 (only 1 76mm gun on board)
1940, DMS Dorsey, Lamberton, Boggs, Elliot, Palmer, Hogan, Howard, Stansbury 1941, Hamilton: - 4 x 1 - 102/50, 1 x 1 - 76/23, 4 x 3 - 533 TT, 1 DCT (Y-gun) + 4 x 1 - 76/50 Mk 20, 2 x 1 - 12.7/90, (2 - 4) DCT, sweeps, one boiler was removed (25kts max)

1940, Little, Gregory, Stringham, Colhoun, McKean 1942, Talbot, Waters, Dent 1943, Schley, Tattnall, Kilty, Ward, Roper, Dickerson, Herbert, Crosby 1944, Rathburne were converted to fast transport with data as follows:


McKean 1942

Displacement standard, t 1315
Displacement full, t 1793
Length, m 95.7
Breadth, m 11.3
Draught, m 3.76
No of shafts 2
Machinery Parsons, Curtis or Westinghouse steam turbines / 1 geared steam turbine for cruising, 4 White Forster, Normand, Yarrow or Thornycroft boilers
Power, h. p. 13000
Max speed, kts 22 - 24
Fuel, t oil 429
Endurance, nm(kts)
Armament APD2 - 6: 3 x 1 - 102/50 Mk 9, 6 x 1 - 12.7/90, 4 DCT, 2 DCR
APD7 - 9: presumably 3 x 1 - 76/50 Mk 20, 6 x 1 - 20/70 Mk 4, 4 DCT, 2 DCR
APD14 - 17, 19 - 22, 25: presumably 3 x 1 - 76/50 Mk 20, 1 x 2 - 40/56 Mk 1/2, 5 x 1 - 20/70 Mk 4, 4 DCT, 2 DCR
Military load 4 LCP(L) or LCP(R) landing craft, 144 troops
Complement 101

1941 - 1942, Lea, Badger, Babbitt, Jacob Jones, Tarbell, Greer, Roper, Dupont, Bernadou, Ellis, Cole, Dickerson, Leary, Schenck, Herbert: - 4 x 1 - 102/50, 1 x 1 - 76/23, 2 x 3 - 533 TT + 6 x 1 - 76/50 Mk 20, 2 x 1 - 12.7/90

1942, McKean, Stringham: - 3 x 1 - 102/50, 6 x 1 - 12.7/90 + 3 x 1 - 76/50 Mk 20, 6 x 1 - 20/70 Mk 4

1942, Lea, Badger, Babbitt, Tarbell, Greer, Roper, Dupont, Bernadou, Ellis, Cole, Dickerson, Leary, Schenck, Herbert: - 4 x 1 - 12.7/90, 1 DCT (Y-gun) + 5 x 1 - 20/70 Mk 4, 6 DCT

1942 - 1943, Gamble, Montgomery, Breese, Ramsay: - 4 x 1 - 102/50, 1 x 1 - 76/23, 2 x 1 - 12.7/90 + 4 x 1 - 76/50 Mk 20, 4 x 1 - 20/70 Mk 4

1942 - 1944, Dorsey, Lamberton, Boggs, Elliot, Palmer, Hogan, Howard, Stansbury, Hamilton: - (1 - 2) x 1 - 76/50, 2 x 1 - 12.7/90 + 1 x 2 - 40/56 Mk 1/2 (on ships with 2 76mm guns), (3 - 5) x 1 - 20/70 Mk 4

1943, McKean, Stringham, Talbot, Waters, Dent: - 1 x 1 - 20/70, + 1 x 2 - 40/56 Mk 1/2

1943, almost all survived: no more than 3 boilers (25kt max), fuel stowage was increased

1943, Crane, Lea, Badger, Babbitt, Tarbell, Upshur, Greer: - (1 - 2) x 1 - 20/70 (4 x 1 Mk 4 on board), 2 DCT + 1 x 24 - 178 Hedgehog DCT

1945, Schley, Rathburne, Talbot, Waters, Kilty: - landing craft and landing capacity

1/1946, APD9, 19: 3 x 1 - 76/50 Mk 22, 1 x 2 - 40/60 Mk 1, 5 x 1 - 20/70 Mk 10, 4 DCT, 2 DCR, 4 LCP(L) or LCP(R) landing craft, 144 troops
1/1946, DMS2: 2 x 1 - 76/50 Mk 20, 1 x 2 - 40/60 Mk 1, 5 x 1 - 20/70 Mk 10, 4 DCT, 2 DCR, sweeps
1/1946, DM18: 4 x 1 - 76/50 Mk 22, 4 x 1 - 20/70 Mk 10, 2 DCR, 80 mines

Starting in 1940, many of the remaining ships were also converted. Sixteen were converted to high-speed transports with the designation APD. Eight were converted to destroyer minesweepers (DMS). Most ships remaining in service during World War II were rearmed with dual-purpose 3-inch (76 mm)/50 caliber guns for better anti-aircraft protection. The AVD seaplane tender conversions received 2 guns the APD transport, DM minelayer, and DMS minesweeper conversions received 3 guns, and those retaining destroyer classification received 6. Also, half of the torpedo tubes were removed in those retained as destroyers all torpedoes were removed from the others. Nearly all had half the boilers removed, for increased fuel and range or to accommodate troops, reducing their speed to 25 knots (46 km/h 29 mph).

In 1937 four Clemson class were converted to destroyer minelayers (DM), joining several Wickes-class ships in this role.
Nineteen were transferred to the Royal Navy in 1940 as part of the Destroyers for Bases Agreement, where they became part of the Town class. Others were upgraded or converted to high-speed transports (APD), high-speed minesweepers (DMS), destroyer minelayers (DM), or seaplane tenders (AVD) and served through World War II. Four Wickes-class DM conversions and the four Clemson-class DM conversions survived to serve in World War II.

Most ships remaining in service during World War II were rearmed with dual-purpose 3-inch/50 caliber guns to provide better anti-aircraft protection. The AVD seaplane tender conversions received two guns the APD high-speed transport, DM minelayer, and DMS minesweeper conversions received three guns, and those retaining destroyer classification received six. Their original low-angle 4-inch/50 caliber guns (Mark 9) were transferred to Defensively Equipped Merchant Ships for anti-submarine protection. For the ships converted to minesweepers, the twelve 21-inch torpedo tubes were replaced by minesweeping gear.


Wickes Class Modifications per the Pacific War Onine Encyclopedia: http://pwencycl.kgbudge.com/W/i/Wickes_class.htm

A number of units were converted before the war to light minelayers by replacing the torpedo banks with storage for 80 mines. These eventually replaced their 4" guns with 3"/50 AA guns and 4 20mm Oerlikon AA guns.
1940-1942: A number were converted to fast minesweepers armed with 4 3"/50 guns, 1x2 40mm Bofors AA guns, and 3 to 5 20mm guns. One boiler was removed. Squared-off false sterns were added to support minesweeping gear. Later two 60kW turbo-generators were installed to support magnetic mine sweeping. Some of these units later removed most of the 3" guns.

1942-1943: A number were converted to fast transports by replacing all torpedo banks with davits for four LCVPs. All fast transports eventually replaced the 4" guns with 6 3"guns, 2x1 40mm guns, and 5 20mm guns and removed their forward boilers, greatly reducing their speed. They could carry a company of Marines.


Clemson Class Modifications per the Pacific War Onine Encyclopedia: http://pwencycl.kgbudge.com/C/l/Clemson_class.htm

Modifications were highly variable by unit, and increasingly so as the war wore on.
As with the Wickes, a number were converted to mine warfare vessels, fast transports, and seaplane tenders.
The seaplane conversions replaced the two forward boilers with gasoline storage (30,000 gallons or 114,000 liters), removing the torpedo tubes, two 4" guns, and the 3" gun, and extended the bridge spaces to incorporate more electronics. Many were converted back to destroyers once sufficient purpose-built seaplane tenders of the Barnegat class had been completed.


History [ edit | edit source ]

Named for Jonathan Haraden, she was launched by Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company, Newport News, Virginia, 4 July 1918 sponsored by Miss Mabel B. Stephens, great-niece of Captain Jonathan Haraden and commissioned at Norfolk Navy Yard 7 June 1919, to Lieutenant Commander R. H. Booth in command.

Haraden was assigned to U.S. Naval Forces in European Waters after calling at Newport for supplies she departed New York 30 June 1919 for duty in the Adriatic Sea. She arrived Split, (then Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes, now Croatia), 28 July 1919 and conducted operations from that port assisting the naval force in the execution of the terms of the Austrian armistice, serving as station ship at Trieste and Rijeka, and participating in maneuvers. This duty occupied her until 23 October 1919, when she departed for Norfolk, Virginia, arriving 18 November.

The destroyer departed Norfolk 7 April 1920 for Charleston, South Carolina, and operated with reserve destroyer divisions out of Charleston -until 15 March 1921. After an extensive overhaul at New York, ending 2 May, Haraden sailed for Newport and training operations off New England. She returned to Charleston 12 October 1921 and to Philadelphia 10 April 1922. Haraden decommissioned 17 July 1922.

With the mounting tensions in 1939, Haraden was called back to active service and recommissioned at Philadelphia 4 December 1939. After shakedown training at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, the destroyer performed neutrality patrol in Cuban waters briefly and then returned to Newport, 6 March 1940. She subsequently conducted neutrality patrol in waters off Block Island and Nantucket Shoals, and made three training cruises in Chesapeake Bay.

Arriving Boston Navy Yard 7 September 1940, Haraden was one of the fifty over-age destroyers to be sent to the United Kingdom in exchange for bases. She sailed 18 September for Halifax, Nova Scotia, and decommissioned there for transfer to the British 24 September 1940. Her name was struck from the Navy List 8 January 1941.


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